Intentional Performers with Brian Levenson
Eric Carcich on Finding Holistic Coaching

Eric Carcich on Finding Holistic Coaching

April 24, 2019

Eric Carcich joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Eric was previously the Head Women’s Rowing Coach at George Washington University and is now the Head Women’s Rowing Coach at Cornell University. Eric has always been passionate about the mental side of rowing. Eric will talk about his journey, how he first found rowing at UMass, and how he’s worked with elite rowers in men’s and women’s rowing. He is very intentional when he thinks about the culture and vision for the program that he’s running, and he cares deeply about his relationships in general, and about his relationships with the athletes that he serves.

In this episode, they discuss what his childhood was like (7:20), the values his parents passed down to him (11:30), what he loved about soccer (12:40), when rowing came into his life (14:00), what it felt like when his friend asked if he was in (19:10), what about his childhood allowed him to go down his path (20:30), what he liked about rowing as a player (22:40), how he got better at rowing (24:20), what came after graduation (25:50), his first-year coaching (29:10), how he reacted to a yelling style of coaching (32:00), when he found his coaching voice (33:20), when he started coaching females (34:30), what made the coach at Yale a great leader (37:00), his experience at Penn and what makes a city special (40:00), what it was like to be the head coach of GW Women’s Rowing (50:30), his vision when he took over (52:00), what sparked his notion of thinking more holistically (54:50), what he does in his other 22 (55:50), how important it is to coach the whole person (1:02:30), how he thinks about balance and integration (1:06:00), his vision for Cornell (1:07:10), and what he’s doing to make sure he’s showing up on a regular basis (1:10:00)

Thank you to Eric for coming on the podcast. You can reach out to Eric via email at ec862@cornell.edu and you can find Cornell Women’s Rowing at https://cornellbigred.com/index.aspx?path=wrow.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Cody Royle on Coaching Context

Cody Royle on Coaching Context

April 17, 2019

Cody Royle joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Cody is passionate about coaching coaches. Cody is an author, keynote speaker, podcast host, and an Australian Rules Football Coach. He is the head coach for AFL Team Canada which is the men’s national program for Aussie Rules Football. Cody is a big voice in the crossover between leadership principles in sports and business. His first book, “Where Others Won’t,” proposed that businesses should look at how pro sports teams look at team dynamic and talent optimization in order to innovate. In this conversation, we also talk about how the sport’s world now needs to leverage some of business’ best practices when it comes to human development and what that might look like going forward. His podcast, “Where Other’s Won’t,” is a great listen and we highly recommend following Cody on twitter @codyroyle.

In this episode, they discuss what life was like as a little kid (5:05), Aussie Rules Football and Cricket (7:30), what he likes about Aussie rules football (9:40), what his childhood was like (11:30), the values his mom passed down to him (12:35), what he thought his future would look like (14:20), how he felt when he couldn’t play at the level he wanted to (16:20), what an emotional wreck meant for him (17:20), why he got involved in coaching (18:10), the steps he took to become a coach (19:40), how he makes sense of the binary of I can do this better, but I still have a lot to learn (21:05), what he likes about coaching (22:30), his thoughts on the CEO mindset vs. a sports coach (25:05), the importance of flipping mindsets (28:40), what he likes about watching coaches (33:00), how he thinks about coaching coaches (39:10), the biggest challenge to people who want to coach coaches (42:40), the difference in being a team coach vs. a coach of coaches (48:10), how he ended up in Canada and why explore this space outside of just being a coach (53:10), what would happen if we used high-performance techniques from athletes to our coaches/front office (1:00:10), information about his podcast and book (1:03:00), why he thinks people were interested in being on his podcast (1:07:00), how he answers what he does (1:09:40), what makes a great writer and where he learned to write (1:10:40), where the idea of nuance and context came from for him (1:14:05), and what he’ll be doing 10 years from now (1:16:00).

Thank you to Cody for coming on the podcast. His book and podcast are both called, “Where Others Won’t,” and you can find those on Amazon, iTunes, etc. You can find Cody on social media on Instagram and Twitter @codyroyle and https://www.codyroyle.com/ houses everything he does.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Lee Sommers on Strength Building

Lee Sommers on Strength Building

April 10, 2019

Lee Sommers joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Lee is a strength and conditioning coach that does amazing work and truly cares about his clients. He is somebody who is a servant leader, somebody who wants to make his athletes and clients as strong as they possibly can be, and he has worked with the tip of the arrow athletes, most notably Katie Ledecky. Lee started working with Katie when she was 15 years old. Lee has carved out a niche for himself in the Washington, DC area working with elite swimmers. He will share his journey and how he became a strength coach at a really young age and helped build Sport and Health’s Sport and Performance Program that works with elite athletes.

In this episode, they discuss what life was like as a kid (4:20), the values his parents passed down to him (6:50), his transition from New York City to Maryland (11:20), his relationship with his Dad (14:05), his experience trying to play college basketball (17:30), what it was like leaving Temple to go to Towson (19:20), how he got into personal training (21:00), how he thinks about his relationship with money (23:30), his first job out of college and experience managing people (31:00), what he did to try to help his employees sell themselves (38:20), how much of his work is modeling vs. explaining how something should be done (39:50), what he does to make sure he’s a conscience coach (41:05), the habits he does to make sure he’s mentally at his best (42:05), his nutrition and strength and conditioning habits (44:50), his thoughts on grit and grind (50:00), his experience working with Katie Ledecky (52:05), where Katie Ledecky’s confidence comes from (56:50), why he believes Katie hasn’t experienced burnout (1:00:30), and his business now (1:01:10)

Thank you to Lee for coming on the podcast. He has started his own business called Purpose Personal Fitness https://ppf-fitness.com/ and he is also a part of Healthy Baller https://www.healthyballer.com/aboutus. He works with all types of athletes and all types of cliental. He is also currently working with swimming teams including both nation capital swim clubs out of Georgetown Prep and RMSC swim club out of the Rockville area. You can find him on social media at @leesommerspt on Instagram, and you can find him on Facebook at Lee Sommers.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Dr. Norman Rosenthal on South Africa, SAD, and Meditation

Dr. Norman Rosenthal on South Africa, SAD, and Meditation

April 3, 2019

Dr. Norman Rosenthal joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Dr. Norman Rosenthal is a world-renowned psychiatrist, researcher, and author who first described seasonal affective disorder, also known as SAD. He pioneered the use of light therapy as a treatment during his 20 years at the National Institute of Mental Health. He is a highly cited researcher and best-selling author, and he has written over 200 scholarly articles and authored or co-authored 8 popular books. Dr. Rosenthal has worked in the weeds with patients and had a private practice while also going deep into the research. He has written books including “The Winter Blues,” and he also has New York Times bestsellers list called “Transcendence” and “The Gift of Adversity.” He has practiced psychiatry for over three decades, coached, and conducted numerous clinical trials of medications and alternative treatments such as transcendental meditation for psychiatric disorders. He and his work have been featured on Good Morning America, The Today Show, NPR, and other national media outlets.

In this episode, they discuss what life was like for him as a kid (4:20), what guilt felt like for him (6:05), what it was like to be stabbed (6:40), how he thinks about gratitude (8:30), his experience with Viktor Frankl (13:50), the distinction between gratitude and forgiveness (16:40), his thoughts on grievances (19:10), if he’d do our jails/criminal system any differently (21:30), when he became a researcher and scientist (23:00), how his parents reacted to his career choice (24:30), the values his parents passed down to him (25:20), how he handles privilege while understanding how quickly things can change (28:30), how life is so multi-faceted (33:00), how he first thought of SAD (35:30), how the community first responded to SAD (38:15), why he didn’t stay on the path of research (40:00), what light therapy is (41:20), about transcendental meditation (43:30), how he thinks about spirituality (45:00), his thoughts on death (47:40), his writing process (51:30), his thoughts on the mindset in preparation vs. performance (55:30), what he does to make sure he’s mentally where he needs to be (59:20), what about his framework allows him to be open to other possibilities (1:01:30), how he navigates when to be open and when to be contrarian (1:05:30), the letter his mom wrote he and his siblings (1:09:50).

Thank you to Dr. Norman Rosenthal for coming on the podcast. You can find more information about Norman at his website at https://www.normanrosenthal.com/ which lists his books and blogs he’s written. You can also find him on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/groups/PoetryRx/.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Miranda Holder on the Coaching Journey

Miranda Holder on the Coaching Journey

March 27, 2019

Miranda Holder joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Miranda is an Executive Coach that has a background in sport. She was a three-sport athlete in High School and then she found Rowing in College where she competed at an elite, high level. She then became a Rowing Coach and ended up becoming the Head Rowing Coach at Georgetown University. That journey of becoming a Rowing Coach ended up leading her to become an Executive Coach. Today, she spends a lot of time working with people in all walks of life in the corporate space, and she considers herself to be an insight wizard and she will give insight into how she came to develop her eye for coaching. She helps people see themselves in their situation more clearly, and for the people brave enough to do the work, there’s an incredible leader, person, and idea ready to surface. She loves to work with people on being the best leader or CEO that they can be while also taking risk to start a company or refusing to settle into a career path that doesn’t elicit joy and excitement. She loves helping people unlock their potential and at her core, she loves coaching.

In this episode, they discuss when rowing first came into her life (5:40), what her childhood was like (8:40), the values her parents instilled in her (9:35), her academic experience (11:30), where her “if it’s meant to be, it’ll be” mindset is rooted in (14:40), what her spiritual lens is (16:40), what her rowing experience was like (19:20), what was exciting about getting up at 4:40 am to row (23:00), the amount of time it took her to get good at rowing (26:20), how she managed what she was doing individually with it being a team sport (28:40), what she would do mentally to prepare for a race (30:30), when she started to pursue the national team (32:10), how it felt when she stopped rowing (35:00), how her rowing coaching experience began (41:00), what she thought her career path was going to be (42:20), if she would’ve had a similar path without the heart condition (43:40), her sport coaching journey (44:40), what she noticed in elite rowers (47:30), how to instill persistence in kids (49:00), what it was like managing a rowing program (53:15), what led to her burnout (56:20), when executive coaching came into her life (58:50), what in her allows her to go get help (1:00:00), what makes her feel alive about executive coaching (1:01:50), how she got interested in yoga (1:06:20), and what she does to make sure she’s mentally, emotionally, and physically strong (1:08:20)

Thank you to Miranda for coming on the podcast. You can email her at Miranda@Mirandaholder.com, and we encourage you to check out her website https://www.mirandaholder.com/.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

David Vobora on the Journey of Being

David Vobora on the Journey of Being

March 20, 2019

David Vobora joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Since 2014, David has painstakingly built a business and a dream around training elite and adaptive athletes. Many of the athletes are wounded warriors, and his adaptive training environment gym provides free 9-week bootcamps to people with amputations, spinal cord injuries, and other disabilities. He’ll say in this conversation a lot of those people are veterans, but not all of them are. He has a ton of respect for veterans, and his foundation is about serving those who are adaptive athletes.

David has appeared on the Ellen DeGeneres show, he’s been to the White House where he shook hands with President Obama, he has had President Bush accompany him, House Speaker Paul Ryan visited the foundation, and they presented him with a set of cuff links with the Presidential seal. Also, when David was 10 years old, a teenage neighbor sexually abused him, and we jump into this in the conversation. He will talk about how that shaped his life and his career. He played professional football for 4.5 years, and he had concussions, a major shoulder injury that ended his career, and he has been through a lot including getting addicted to opioids and his experience with suicide. David will share his journey, his mindset, and what he’s learned about emotion and building emotional strength in this deep conversation.

In this episode, they discuss what his childhood was like (6:00), the tools he used to get him in the space to be a linebacker (9:20), how being sexually assaulted drove him on the football (11:30), what allowed him to be successful when the lights came on in college (14:00), if we’re better served focusing on the becoming or the being (17:00), the earning of wisdom (22:30), what his football career would’ve looked like if he had the emotional strength he has now (24:30), the inner work he did emotionally (26:05), where his mental capacity came from (30:00), how his mental models have changed (32:00), how he dealt with his suicidal thoughts (37:20), if he had family members that dealt with similar addictive issues (43:10), if there’s someone that is doing an amazing job of becoming and being (45:10), the habits/tools he does to optimize his human experience (48:20), when he feels most alive (51:00), a word he would use to describe himself (54:10), if he has a religious or spiritual framework (55:20), why he’s going to climb Mount Kilimanjaro (58:30), the qualities super heroes have (1:00:00), what he does to make sure he’s becoming his own super hero (1:01:00), what he’s up to now (1:02:20), and where he hopes he is in ten years (1:08:20)

Thank you to David for coming on the podcast. We encourage you to follow the Adaptive Training Foundation on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter. Go to http://adaptivetrainingfoundation.org/ to check out their site that shows the rosters of the people that are training, and we encourage you to help this incredible mission.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Don Yaeger on Curiosity and Writing

Don Yaeger on Curiosity and Writing

March 13, 2019

Don Yaeger joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Don is an award-winning keynote speaker, business leadership coach, 11-time New York Times best selling author and a long-time associate editor for Sports Illustrated. Don is a writer, but what has made him a great writer over the years is his thirst for curiosity on how people compete at their highest level. As a speaker, he has worked with audiences as diverse as Fortune 500 companies and Cancer Survivor groups, where he shares his personal stories. In this episode, you will hear how Don is a story-teller and many of the stories he tells involve elite competitors. He loves to share the human side of those elite performers in these stories.

In this episode, they discuss when writing first came into his life (4:00), what life was like for him as a kid (6:40), how faith was a big part of his upbringing (8:50), the values his parents passed down to him (9:40), when sports came into his life (11:20), what he loves about sports (12:10), what inspired him to pursue a career in sports journalism (13:35), the similarities he observes in different environments that he’s involved in (16:20), if curiosity and/or competition can be developed (18:40), David Ross story about how he developed his leadership (21:05), what allowed David Ross to interpret something as feedback as opposed to criticism (25:20), what David Ross learned that makes a great teammate (27:20), how he saw people mentally prepare and then shift when they got between the lines (31:30), why he pivoted to do other things in his career besides journalism (35:40), when he feels most alive (39:50), his biggest fear (42:10), what he intentionally does to make sure his greatest fear doesn’t happen (42:40), if you can be great in your career while being great in your home life (43:50), what he does to be present (45:30), how he writes a book a year (46:40), and what he learned from himself from this conversation that he’ll take with him (51:30).

Thank you to Don for coming on the podcast. You can follow him on Instagram, LinkedIn, and Twitter @DonYaeger and he shares a quote a day with a group of about 50,000 people at 8 am ET. He has also built an online learning class that has a meaningful purpose and takes them from point a to point b. Their first course just went live a few weeks ago, and it’s called Journey to Greatness, and they go through the elements of what he’s learned from the greatest winners he’s had a chance to work with.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Sportscaster Bram Weinstein

Sportscaster Bram Weinstein

March 6, 2019

Bram Weinstein joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Bram covered the Washington Redskins for a number of years, worked on sports talk radio, and eventually became an anchor on ESPN’s SportsCenter. When he finished up at ESPN, he came back to the DC area in sports talk radio, and now he has decided that he wants to go into the world of podcast production. He brings a great perspective on performing under the pressure. He also shares his thoughts on media, and specifically sports talk media in this conversation.

In this episode, they discuss the crazy story when Bram and Brian first met (4:10), what life was like for him as a kid (12:10), if his parents wanted him to go into broadcast journalism (14:10), the dynamic with his siblings (16:30), the values his parents passed down to him (17:30), where creativity comes from for him and his brother (19:30), where he saw himself while in high school (22:10), what covering the Redskins involved (23:05), how much ESPN was around during his childhood (25:00), his interview process with ESPN (27:10), his thoughts on the mindset in preparation vs. performance (29:30), how he listens during interviews (35:30), the people he emulated (38:00), how much of broadcasting is writing (39:40), the difference between print and broadcast (43:00), when he has felt most alive in his career (44:30), what lead writing is (46:00), how gratitude has helped or hurt him (47:30), what it’s like to be on sports talk radio (53:40), what his authentic self looks like (56:20), the biggest mistake he’s made on air (57:40), how he balances fandom and doing what he loves (58:40), the routines/habits he does to make sure he’s ready to perform (1:00:20), if he ever gets nervous (1:02:30), his thoughts on preparation before performance (1:08:30), what he’s up to now (1:10:30), his biggest fear (1:12:30), what the media landscape will look like in 2030 (1:14:30), and how he makes sense of the AAF ratings being so high (1:16:15)

Thank you to Bram for coming on the podcast. You can find him @RealBramW on Twitter and Instagram. AmpireMedia.com will be coming out shortly, and it will coincide with the studio getting up and running. Bram is open for business and has a long history of performing so he brings a unique view point of how things should be put together. At the same time, he is looking forward to collaborating with people on ideas and stories and is open to all ideas.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Honest Tea Founder Seth Goldman

Honest Tea Founder Seth Goldman

February 27, 2019

Honest Tea Founder Seth Goldman joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Seth Goldman is the Co-Founder and TeaEO Emeritus at Honest Tea. He started Honest Tea years ago and he is also the Executive Chair of Beyond Meat. We will talk about both companies in detail and the mission behind both companies. Honest Tea specializes in beverage that are a tad sweet, organic and fair trade certified. In March 2011, Honest Tea was acquired by the Coca Cola Company becoming the first organic and fair-trade brand in the world’s largest beverage distribution system. Honest Tea and Honest Kids is sold in over 140,000 stores in the US and Europe including McDonald's, Subway, and Chick-fil-A. Beyond Meat is also rapidly expanding distribution as the company seeks to expand the accessibility and availability of plant-based protein. You will hear Seth’s passion for vegetarianism and providing plant-based options that can provide protein for us. Seth is passionate about providing quality ingredients to humans so they can fuel their body and live a better life. Seth also serves on the board of Ripple Foods, the Yale School of Management, and Bethesda Green. Seth is a “multi-tasker” that likes to create, innovate, and disrupt, and he is passionate about making this world a better place.

In this episode, they discuss what childhood was like (5:20), where his mother’s interest in Chinese history came from (6:30), what his father was like (8:00), how his parents helped shape his perspective (9:30), how his parents reinforced that he was special (12:30), the values his family all share (13:20), what high school was like for him (14:20), the difference between being spoiled and being special (18:20), why he kept with wrestling (20:00), where his confidence comes from (21:00), when running came into his life (22:50), what he was like theater wise (24:30), his experience at Harvard (25:40), what motivates him to do all these different things (27:00), what he did right after college (27:40), his mindset when he is performing (31:00), the things he would do to train his mind (32:30), what he did to practice presence (33:20), how his parents reacted when he didn’t do something academic (35:20), what his preparation was like (36:30), what causes him to not be at his best (39:10), what it was like when his dad passed away (41:00), what he did after China (42:00), his thoughts on how he sees non-profits succeed (45:30), what bubbled up for him while at business school (47:00), when Honest Tea came to be for him and what he enjoys about creating (48:10), how he develops his relationship with fear and what excitement feels like for him (53:40), what it was like being a brand in Bethesda, Maryland (55:20), the advice he gives to entrepreneurs (56:00), what attracted him to Beyond Meat (58:20), how he responds to people that think his ideas won’t work (59:30), how he handles investors and his relationship with his employees (1:01:20), his partnership with Coca Cola (1:02:20), what makes a good leader (1:03:10), what he envisions for himself in the future (1:04:40) , the quotes, frameworks, or philosophies that help guide his life (1:08:40) , his thoughts on the mindset in preparation vs. performance (1:10:30), when he looks for help (1:12:40), and how religion guides him (1:13:40)

Thank you to Seth for coming on the podcast! We encourage you to check out Honest Tea and Honest Kids which is currently expanding around the country. Beyond Meat is also growing quickly and they have a beyond burger and beyond sausage that is available in places like Whole Foods, Kreuger, and Safeway, and also now at Carl’s Jr., BurgerFi, TGI Friday’s, and here locally at Silver. Seth is also on the board of Ripple Foods which sells plant-based dairy made with peas. Bethesda Green is the local non-profit he founded 10 years ago, and they have a green business incubator, and they are working hard to engage the community of Bethesda in sustainability and finding ways for them to live greener, more sustainable lives. https://www.netimpact.org/ is another organization he’s interested in that is helping to organize MBA and college students interested in business to pursue careers in socially responsible businesses. Last, his co-founder Barry Nalebuff and he published a comic book called Mission in a Bottle, and it’s a fun retelling of the Honest Tea story in a comic book story that shows the lessons they’ve learned.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian

Executive Director of PeacePlayers, Brendan Tuohey on Building Peace

Executive Director of PeacePlayers, Brendan Tuohey on Building Peace

February 20, 2019

Brendan Tuohey joins us on this week’s episode of the podcast. Brendan is an Executive Director at PeacePlayers. Brendan grew up in the DC area in a diverse environment which has helped shape his life. At PeacePlayers they are inspiring people to see each other as people through the game of basketball. Brendan played Division 1 basketball at Colgate so he’ll talk about that experience, and then he’ll talk about his experience at Peace Players. Brendan serves over 100 employees and over 6500 kids throughout the world. PeacePlayers has sites in Israel, Cyprus, South Africa, Ireland, Los Angeles, Chicago, Detroit, Brooklyn, and Baltimore. They are expanding rapidly into the U.S. and their mission is to have people leverage the game of basketball so they can go into areas of conflict and start seeing each other as humans and develop empathy. Brendan is a terrific leader that empowers people in his organization and is very thoughtful about how he sets up his organization and what he wants the organization to be moving forward.

In this episode, they discuss what childhood was like in the Tuohey household (5:20), if his parents were into basketball (8:30), how hard work played a role in his childhood (10:20), how much academics were stressed (11:40), how religion played a role in his life (13:00), what it was like growing up in DC (14:50), his experience at Gonzaga (16:40), if he had any fear leaving Gonzaga (19:20), what he means by “being in the middle of things,” (21:15), when he started to thrive at basketball (28:50), what his experience was like at Colgate (31:10), what he did to set his mind for success while playing basketball (37:00), what he was thinking he’d do with his major (39:00), his experience playing and coaching in Ireland (39:30), his experience coaching in Northern Ireland (46:50), where the idea for PeacePlayers came from (49:00), about his brother Sean (53:10), when he began full-time with PeacePlayers (58:50), where his overconfidence comes from (1:00:00), where he gained self-awareness to figure out how to build these programs (1:02:10), where his ability to ask good questions came from (1:04:20), what makes a good leader (1:06:30), how he balances the press (1:09:00), how he leads and supports people who work for PeacePlayers around the globe (1:13:15), what they’ve learned from the Olympics and other sporting activities (1:20:00), how many kids are touched by PeacePlayers and how many employees (1:21:10), how he manages 6500 kids and 100 plus employees on his shoulders (1:22:10) , the tools he uses to make sure he’s the best leader he can be (1:24:00), and how he prepares (1:25:10)

Thank you to Brendan for coming on the podcast. PeacePlayers is currently making plans this summer for Baltimore, Brooklyn, Detroit, Chicago, and LA. If people are interested in getting involved, they can look at their website https://www.peaceplayers.org/. They also have a program on their website that supports volunteers, so we encourage you to check out the website.

Lastly, if you liked this episode and/or any others, please support us at Patreon or follow me on Twitter: @brianlevenson or Instagram: @Intentional_Performers.

Thanks for listening.

-Brian